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TOPIC: G Gracenote on F from E

G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #218

  • Kasie
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Hello there pipers!

In the 6th bar of "Scot's Wha Ha'e", there is a G gracenote on F that comes after E.

My question is, when going from E to the G gracenote on F, do you lift off BOTH your F and G fingers, or JUST your G finger (and then the G finger comes down while the F finger goes up for the F note)?

My guess is you lift off BOTH because when I do it that way it sounds better.
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Re: G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #219

  • Kasie
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I should have titled this post something like, "G Gracenote on F from a Lower Note" since if I were B to G gracenote on F, it would be the same question.

:cheer: Kasie
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Re: G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #222

  • ggreig
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Hi Kassie,

Funny, I never thought about this, it happens so automatically. I have checked with the College of Piping Tutor and this is what it says about changing notes with a grace note on the second - in this case a G gracenote: play the first note, raise the high G finger alone to sound the gracenote and as it is falling change your fingers to the position for the second note.

Hope this helps.
George
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Re: G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #224

  • Kasie
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Hi George,

Thanks for looking up the rule in your College of Piping book. I have the latest edition, and can't find that statement in my book.

I suspect there is at least one exception to that rule of lifting only one finger to make the gracenote, and then as you bring it back down, the other fingers go up to make the following note.

I think there's an exception, because it sounds strange when I do a G grace note on F from E that way.

Could you play this tune I've attatched, and see what you do when it comes to the circled part?

THANKS A LOT GEORGE!

=Kasie=

Attachment granny_duncan.GIF not found



If you can't see this image very well, here's a link to the full song:

breizhpartitions.free.fr/en/download_sco...hp/195_Granny_Duncan
Last Edit: 2 years 9 months ago by Kasie. Reason: To add a link
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Re: G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #225

  • Tunni
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Kasie I'd normally play that practically simultaineously (sp?!) as you lift the E finger to sound the F chuck the G grace note in at the same time, aiming to finish the move and the grace note together. If you are playing it very slowly while you are getting to grips with it all sound the E play a G gracenote by lifting the F finger only and then move to F as quickly as you can manage while still keeping the sound clean. G grace notes are only ever played by lifting the F finger on its own.
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Re: G Gracenote on F from E 2 years 9 months ago #228

  • ggreig
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Kasie,

You will find the guidance on the middle of page 29 of the latest edition of the Col of Piping tutor (part 1).
I have checked out what I play, including 'Grannie Duncan' which is your example. As has been stated, it is almost simultaneous, but there is no exception; the first finger goes up to produce the high G for the grace note and as it is falling BUT STILL SOUNDING G the second finger is raised such that when the first finger lands the next note which sounds is F. It may seem strange but it is easier that way and produces a crisper sound; I suspect that it is easier to move the two fingers in opposite directions than to raise both and then put one back down - which is fortuate since doing it the CoP way is what you should do. With a bit of practice, it will become automatic and you won't think about it.
What is ESSENTIAL is that the only sounds which should be heard are the starting note of E, the high G of the grace note and then the F. That means that the second finger must come up while the chanter is sounding the G grace note; if it is a fraction late and there is a hint of an 'extra' E, you will get what is called a 'crossing note' and that ruins the effect and must be avoided.

George.
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